Regarding the Roundtable on Intersectionality

(I’ve already said something about this on twitter, but I wanted to put this here in a more permanent form.)

So! I did a roundtable, it was titled (unhelpfully) ‘Intersectional SFF Roundtable’. It’s pretty nonspecific and, frankly, a shit title. Concerns were raised and I’d like to address them.

First I want to thank writers L. D. Lewis (@ElleLewis6) and Justina Ireland for raising the very just point: that the roundtable failed to include black contributors–even though the concept and term of intersectionality was coined by Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw, a black woman and civil rights activist. This is a huge failure on my part. Some terminology was also used imprecisely within the roundtable itself. The right term should probably have been ‘from the global south’ (and that would have also been a more exact, more specific title). Much of our vocabulary for discussing race, reparative justice and post-colonialism originated from black activists, and it’s injurious to appropriate them without including black voices in the discussion.

It’s especially wrong to center the discussion on how marginalized readers and writers might feel they aren’t being represented by the dominant discourse while excluding a demographic that’s lived with untold generations of erasure. This implies that I think the dominant discourse doesn’t sideline and ignore black people (it does). In doing this I’ve committed an act of double erasure. I recognize that this is not simply ‘just using the word intersectionality’: it is more and deeper than that.

I own the mistake, make no excuses, and apologize. This is all on me.

(Anti-blackness, needless to say, is a global phenomenon and not exclusive to white-majority countries. Black people are treated terribly in Asia, and there’s a specific exclusion of black Asians, so much so that they are often not viewed as being Asian. I credit, particularly, following Riley H. at @dtwps who speaks up about this aspect of anti-blackness often, and from whom I’ve learned a great deal.)

I’d also like to thank L. D. Lewis and Troy L. Wiggins (@TroyLWiggins) for being very patient. I was hesitant to reach out not because I didn’t want to be held accountable, but because I didn’t want to ask them to perform emotional labor they were hardly obliged to. They treated me with more charity than I deserve. (I’m also individually apologetic to them for taking up as much of their time and energy as I have; I hope I’ll be able to repay them in some form.)

Troy brought up the very good point that I may not have been the right roundtable host, and I could have recommended someone else for the job that would be able to tackle the topic with more finesse and consideration. If something like this comes up again, that’s definitely what I would do, especially for an opportunity with monetary compensation (this one was not; it was done to help promote an anthology).

Beyond that, I promise to watch myself better. Anti-blackness is a real blind spot for me and I’m often too complacent about the fact. I’ll continue to signal-boost and support (financially or otherwise) black voices in all respects, as that seems to be the most useful thing I can do. Some starting points:

Fiyah Magazine’s Shop

L. D. Lewis’ PayPal 

Riley H.’s PayPal

(I have named L. D. Lewis and Justina Ireland as the black writers who raised these concerns initially, because they are the ones I am aware of; if I missed any other, do let me know!)

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